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How To Talk About Videogames$
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Ian Bogost

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780816699117

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816699117.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 22 May 2022

Perpetual Adolescence

Perpetual Adolescence

Chapter:
(p.172) 20 Perpetual Adolescence
Source:
How To Talk About Videogames
Author(s):

Ian Bogost

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816699117.003.0020

This chapter provides a detailed analysis of the game Gone Home by the Fullbright Company—made up of people who helped create Bioshock, but wanted to explore deep themes more freely. Gone Home pushes boundaries of what types of themes games approach and explore, but Bogost expresses that it is not as well-written a narrative as someone with a literary background might expect. Video games are stuck in adolescence—appealing to a specific audience that is mostly young, and not the same group of people that likes to read great works of literature. Bogost urges videogames to improve the literary merit and maturity of videogame narratives, in order to catch up with the rest of American culture.

Keywords:   Gone Home, Bioshock, the Fullbright Company, literary criticism, cultural criticism, demographics, mature videogames, adolescence, coming-of-age

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