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How To Talk About Videogames$
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Ian Bogost

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780816699117

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816699117.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 16 May 2022

Racketeer Sports

Racketeer Sports

Chapter:
(p.44) 6 Racketeer Sports
Source:
How To Talk About Videogames
Author(s):

Ian Bogost

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816699117.003.0006

This chapter discusses how the real danger of videogames isn’t violence; it’s swindling. The recent history of discussing violent. It examines how by the early 1990s titles like Mortal Kombat and events like Columbine had sealed games’ fate. If games were going to be corrupt and wicked, they were going to do so in the same way as literature and film and television had been thought to do: through their content, not their form or their operation. In so doing, one of the most obvious troublesome connections between videogames and moral degeneration has been left largely unexplored and unquestioned. It’s the idea that videogames might overlap with corruption and manipulation of the type found in casino gaming through the manner in which they are distributed and the manner in which player’s win and lose in a game. This chapter focuses on free-to-play games, and describes them as a racket.

Keywords:   videogames, violence, swindling, content, form, free-to-play games, racket

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