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Awakening the EyeRobert Frank's American Cinema$
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George Kouvaros

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780816695560

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816695560.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

He’s Not There

He’s Not There

Me and My Brother, One Hour

Chapter:
(p.61) 2 He’s Not There
Source:
Awakening the Eye
Author(s):

George Kouvaros

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816695560.003.0002

Chapter 2 locates Frank’s first feature-length film Me and My Brother in two interconnected contexts: one, that of the new forms of non-fiction filmmaking that emerged in the wake of Direct Cinema and, the other, that of the discontinuous narrative structures associated with the French New Wave. In unpacking how these contexts left their mark on Frank’s development as a filmmaker, I pay particular attention to the affinity between Me and My Brother and Shirley Clarke’s extraordinary 99-minute direct-to-camera interview, Portrait of Jason (1967). In both films we find a model of filmmaking characterized by a crossing of frontiers between documentary and fiction, and between filmmaker and subject.

Keywords:   Me and My Brother, Robert Frank, Non-fiction filmmaking, Direct Cinema, French New Wave, Film studies, American film, Shirley Clarke, Portrait of Jason, Documentary

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