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The American Isherwood$
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James J. Berg and Chris Freeman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780816683611

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816683611.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 15 June 2021

Spiritual Searching in Isherwood’s Artistic Production

Spiritual Searching in Isherwood’s Artistic Production

Chapter:
(p.179) 13 Spiritual Searching in Isherwood’s Artistic Production
Source:
The American Isherwood
Author(s):

Mario Faraone

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816683611.003.0013

This chapter focuses on Christopher Isherwood’s search for the spiritual through his American writings. In his “Afterword” to his 1963 pamphlet An Approach to Vedanta, Isherwood describes the long road that brought him to Vedanta and explains that the contact with Swami Prabhavananda was above all a relationship through which he looked for a “still center” in life and art. Religious discourse plays an important role in Isherwood’s writings. Initially through Vedantic daily religious chores and rituals, and then thanks to Vedantic thought, Isherwood changes his way of reading the world and himself, which had been the main themes of his narrative. He approached Vedanta through Gerald Heard’s suggestion of meditation and yoga. Meeting Swami Prabhavananda in August 1939 was the beginning of the search of psychological and spiritual balance he subsequently appears to have found.

Keywords:   meditation, yoga, Christopher Isherwood, Vedanta, Swami Prabhavananda

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