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The Essential Ellen Willis$
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Ellen Willis and Nona Willis Aronowitz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780816681204

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816681204.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 23 June 2021

Rodney King’s Revenge

Rodney King’s Revenge

Chapter:
(p.334) Rodney King’s Revenge
Source:
The Essential Ellen Willis
Author(s):

Nona Willis Aronowitz

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816681204.003.0036

This chapter focuses on the trial of O. J. Simpson, who was accused of two counts of murder in relation to the deaths of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and waiter Ronald Lyle Goldman. Simpson’s history of violence against Nicole was damning, even without the evidence Judge Lance Ito had disallowed. There was simply too much physical evidence to be entirely invalidated by the bungling that had surrounded its collection. In the end, however, the jury returned a verdict of not guilty. The Rodney King case was the wrong gird to lay on O. J. Simpson, but it’s wrong to equate the verdict with the South’s old habit of routinely acquitting whites who committed crimes against blacks. The jury in the O. J. Simpson case did not act out of animus toward the victims because of their race, or Nicole because of her sex; it didn’t imply that their deaths were a good thing for the social order; it simply ignored them.

Keywords:   trial, O. J. Simpson, murder, Nicole Brown Simpson, Ronald Lyle Goldman, jury, Rodney King, whites, blacks, race

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