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The Essential Ellen Willis$
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Ellen Willis and Nona Willis Aronowitz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780816681204

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816681204.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Abortion

Abortion

Is a Woman a Person?

Chapter:
(p.89) Abortion
Source:
The Essential Ellen Willis
Author(s):

Nona Willis Aronowitz

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816681204.003.0013

This chapter examines the debate over abortion rights. Abortion used to be almost always discussed in feminist terms—as a political issue affecting the condition of women. Since then, the right-to-life movement has succeeded in getting the public and the media to see abortion as an abstract moral issue having solely to do with the rights of fetuses. The “pro-life” position is based on a crucial fallacy: that the question of fetal rights can be isolated from the question of women’s rights. In their zeal to preserve fetal life at all costs, antiabortionists are ready to grant fetuses more legal protection than people. Despite its numerical insignificance, the antiabortion left epitomizes the hypocrisy of the right-to-life crusade. Its need to wrap misogyny in the rhetoric of social conscience and even feminism is actually a perverse tribute to the women’s movement; it is no longer acceptable to declare openly that women deserve to suffer for the sin of Eve.

Keywords:   feminism, abortion, women, right-to-life movement, fetal rights, women’s rights, antiabortion, left

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