Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Beginning to See the LightSex, Hope, and Rock-and-Roll$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ellen Willis

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816680788

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816680788.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 25 July 2021

Dylan

Dylan

Chapter:
(p.3) Dylan
Source:
Beginning to See the Light
Author(s):

Ellen Willis

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816680788.003.0001

This chapter presents the author’s reflections about Bob Dylan and his music. She talks about his growing detachment from the public, his refusal to be known, which also shaped his work. As his songs became more introspective, the introspections became more impersonal, the confidences of a no-man without past or future. Dylan as identifiable persona began disappearing into his songs; which is what he wanted, but what terrified his audiences. She describes Dylan as a fifth-columnist from the past, shaped by personal and political nonconformity, by blues and modern poetry. He imposed his commitment to individual freedom (and its obverse, isolation) on the hip passivity of pop culture, his literacy on an illiterate music. He used the publicity machine to demonstrate his belief in privacy. His songs and public role are guides to survival in the world of the image, and in coming to terms with that world, he has forced it to come to terms with him.

Keywords:   Bob Dylan, musicians, music, freedom, privacy

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.