Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
George CukorA Double Life$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Patrick McGilligan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780816680382

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816680382.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 30 June 2022

Chaptr Six

Chaptr Six

Chapter:
(p.129) Chaptr Six
Source:
George Cukor
Author(s):

Patrick McGilligan

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816680382.003.0006

This chapter focuses on some important developments in George Cukor’s career as a Hollywood director, including the deaths of George Cukor’s mother, Helen Gross Cukor, and MGM producer Irving Thalberg during the filming of Camille and the controversy surrounding the 1939 movie Gone with the Wind. Since Cukor’s MGM contract was directly tied to Thalberg’s health, he was duly informed that he was legally entitled to break it within thirty days of the producer’s passing. Nevertheless, the studio made him a generous renewal offer: a five-year contract at the salary of $4,000 weekly. The MGM offer raised the bidding for Cukor, with David O. Selznick of RKO countering with a revised contract package for the director. Cukor agreed to direct Gone with the Wind for Selznick, but he was fired shortly after filming had begun and was replaced by Victor Fleming.

Keywords:   George Cukor, Helen Gross Cukor, MGM, Irving Thalberg, Camille, David O. Selznick, RKO, Gone with the Wind, Victor Fleming, Hollywood

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.