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Backwater BluesThe Mississippi Flood of 1927 in the African American Imagination$
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Richard M. Mizelle Jr.

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780816679256

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816679256.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 19 June 2021

Where Sixteen Railroads Meet the Sea

Where Sixteen Railroads Meet the Sea

Migration and the Making of Houston’s Frenchtown

Chapter:
(p.101) 4 Where Sixteen Railroads Meet the Sea
Source:
Backwater Blues
Author(s):

Richard M. Mizelle

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816679256.003.0005

Chapter IV argues how the 1927 flood shaped broader migration patterns, particularly the movement of self-described Creoles of color from Southwest Louisiana to Houston. In the process, migrants helped shape a distinctive neighborhood in Houston known as Frenchtown. Their presence in Houston complicated the racial hierarchy in the 1920s and 1930s, and the evolution of a blended neighborhood showed the ways in which the 1927 flood influenced the nation beyond borders and backwaters.

Keywords:   Disasters, Blues, Historical Fiction, Great Migration, Levees, 1928 Flood Control Act, Charity, New Deal, Mississippi Flood Control Project, Yazoo Mississippi Delta

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