Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
House, but No GardenApartment Living in Bombay's Suburbs, 1898-1964$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nikhil Rao

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780816678129

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816678129.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

The Spread of Apartment Living

The Spread of Apartment Living

Chapter:
(p.137) 4 The Spread of Apartment Living
Source:
House, but No Garden
Author(s):

Nikhil Rao

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816678129.003.0005

This chapter discusses the three developments in the building industry that resulted in the proliferation of the Bombay flat in the 1930s and 1940s: the generalized availability of cheap cement and reinforced cement concrete, the emergence of a new generation of Indian architects who were willing and able to build according to Indian needs, and, finally, the development of municipal bylaws that led to the standardization of the Bombay flat. Similarly important to the physical manifestations of apartment living are the spread of living practices employed by apartment households. The apartments took into its spatial considerations the needs of a bourgeois nuclear family—the upper-caste and lower-middle-class families—that were the intended residents for these spaces. In turn, these families and their living practices have codified apartment living as the quintessential form of living in Bombay.

Keywords:   Bombay flat, building industry, living practices, bourgeois nuclear family, apartment living, standardization

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.