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Debates in the Digital Humanities$
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Matthew K. Gold

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816677948

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816677948.001.0001

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Should Liberal Arts Campuses Do Digital Humanities? Process and Products in the Small College World

Should Liberal Arts Campuses Do Digital Humanities? Process and Products in the Small College World

Chapter:
(p.368) Chapter 21 Should Liberal Arts Campuses Do Digital Humanities? Process and Products in the Small College World
Source:
Debates in the Digital Humanities
Author(s):

Bryan Alexander

Rebecca Frostdavis

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816677948.003.0037

This chapter examines the liberal arts sector, small colleges, and universities focused on traditional-age undergraduate education, ones that have apparently played little role in the digital humanities movement. It considers the sector’s relative silence, as it identifies a series of reasonable objections to the engagement of liberal arts colleges in the digital humanities. It summarizes these objections and then identifies responses. This call-and-response framing is used in order to take criticism seriously, while fully delineating the liberal arts sector’s achievements. The mismatch between critique and liberal arts practice uncovered by this framing is revealing. Ultimately, those achievements have come to constitute a different mode for the digital humanities, a separate path worth identifying, understanding, and encouraging, one based on emphasizing a distributed, socially engaged process over a focus on publicly shared products.

Keywords:   liberal arts, digital humanities, small colleges, universities, undergraduate education

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