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Debates in the Digital Humanities$
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Matthew K. Gold

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816677948

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816677948.001.0001

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Electronic Errata: Digital Publishing, Open Review, and the Futures of Correction

Electronic Errata: Digital Publishing, Open Review, and the Futures of Correction

Chapter:
(p.259) Chapter 15 Electronic Errata: Digital Publishing, Open Review, and the Futures of Correction
Source:
Debates in the Digital Humanities
Author(s):

Paul Fyfe

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816677948.003.0027

This chapter takes on the issues of digital publishing and publishing errors. It looks into the history of printing errors and the labor of correction, which offers valuable perspectives on the proliferating effects of “accidentals” and error within the automation, syndication, and algorithmic relations of the web. This history informs how scholarly publishing’s digital futures might (or might not) deal with the issue, including open review, crowd-sourced or distributed corrections, automated redundancy systems in libraries, and intelligent computing agents. The history of error also opens some theoretical perspectives, suggesting that, even if we do not dedicate technology or labor to these issues, the digital humanities needs to reckon conceptually with “the importance of failure.” Scholarly publishing will inevitably change, but before its print-based model totters into the grave we need clearer commitments about the error proofing it has traditionally undertaken as well as the consequences of reinventing or abandoning such functions altogether as we move to new formats.

Keywords:   printing errors, correction, accidentals, digital humanities, digital publishing

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