Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Debates in the Digital Humanities$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Matthew K. Gold

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816677948

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816677948.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 25 November 2020

Why Are the Digital Humanities So White? or Thinking the Histories of Race and Computation

Why Are the Digital Humanities So White? or Thinking the Histories of Race and Computation

Chapter:
(p.139) Chapter 9 Why Are the Digital Humanities So White? or Thinking the Histories of Race and Computation
Source:
Debates in the Digital Humanities
Author(s):

Tara Mcpherson

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816677948.003.0017

This chapter argues that the difficulties encountered in knitting together discussions of race with technological productions within the digital humanities (or in studies of code) are an effect of the very designs of our technological systems—designs that emerged in post-World War II computational culture. These origins of the digital continue to haunt scholarly engagements with computers, underwriting the ease with which we partition off considerations of race in our work in digital humanities and digital media studies. The chapter draws analogies between shifting racial and political formations and the emerging structures of digital computing in the late 1960s to highlight the ways in which the organization of information and capital in the 1960s responds—across many registers—to the struggles for racial justice and democracy that so categorized the United States at the time.

Keywords:   digital humanities, race, digital media studies, computational culture, racial justice, 1960s

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.