Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Creole IndigeneityBetween Myth and Nation in the Caribbean$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shona N. Jackson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816677757

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816677757.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 20 June 2021

Beyond Caliban, or the “Third Space” of Labor and Indigeneity

Beyond Caliban, or the “Third Space” of Labor and Indigeneity

Chapter:
(p.211) Conclusion: Beyond Caliban, or the “Third Space” of Labor and Indigeneity
Source:
Creole Indigeneity
Author(s):

Shona N. Jackson

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816677757.003.0007

This concluding chapter suggests a significant shift in Caribbean studies, stressing the need to go beyond Caliban and the metaphysics of modern labor. What is at stake in the ability to stop acting out Caliban’s role is both indigenous sovereignty and land rights, as well as a rejection of being in terms of capitalism and the continued requirement of master/slave modes of being that cannot account for Amerindian epistemologies. The various modes presented in the book ties the displacement of the narrative and political position of “prior arrival” to the solidification of black and other Creole modes of settler belonging in the New World. It also looks into studies done by others such as Elizabeth DeLoughrey and Kevin Bruyneel who present a “third space of sovereignty”, which is produced when the inherent sovereignty of Indigenous Peoples confronts the special and temporal ways of interpreting that sovereignty within the U.S. political system.

Keywords:   Caribbean studies, Caliban, indigenous sovereignty, Amerindian epistemologies, prior arrival, Elizabeth DeLoughre, Kevin Bruyneel, Indigenous Peoples, inherent sovereignty

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.