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Once Were PacificM ori Connections to Oceania$
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Alice Te Punga Somerville

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816677566

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816677566.001.0001

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A Time and a Place

A Time and a Place

Chapter:
(p.213) Epilogue A Time and a Place
Source:
Once Were Pacific
Author(s):

Alice Te Punga Somerville

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816677566.003.0013

This chapter considers the potentially negative connotation of an argument by which “indigenous bodies” might be recorded as “migrant bodies”. It discusses the project Once Were Pacific's demands for a regional identification that “emphasizes” rather than “distracts” from indigeneity. The chapter concludes with a review of Once Were Pacific's portrayal of Tupaia's painting of an Englishman bearing tapa and a Māori man bearing seafood in 1769. Once Were Pacific perceives Tupaia's painting in terms of the complicated dynamic of Māori-Pacific connection, implying that a symbolic reunion of the artwork describes a tangible affirmation of Pacific oral traditions and cultural practices.

Keywords:   indigenous bodies, migrant bodies, Once Were Pacific, regional identification, indigeneity, Tupaia, Māori-Pacific connection, oral traditions, cultural practices

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