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Escape from New YorkThe New Negro Renaissance beyond Harlem$
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Davarian L. Baldwin and Minkah Makalani

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780816677382

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816677382.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2019

An International African Opinion: Amy Ashwood Garvey and C. L. R. James in Black Radical London

An International African Opinion: Amy Ashwood Garvey and C. L. R. James in Black Radical London

Chapter:
(p.77) 3 An International African Opinion: Amy Ashwood Garvey and C. L. R. James in Black Radical London
Source:
Escape from New York
Author(s):

Minkah Makalani

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816677382.003.0004

This chapter examines the anticolonial networks established by Cyril Lionel Robert James, Amy Ashwood Garvey, and George Padmore in 1930s London in relation to the New Negro movement. The focus on anticolonial London aims to broaden the historical lens not only beyond Harlem, but also beyond the United States, to stress a geographic expanse that would include the Caribbean, Africa, and key metropolitan nodes in Europe. Garvey and James were founders of the International African Friends of Ethiopia (IAFE), which joined forces with black anticolonial activists in London in the summer of 1935 to protest Italy’s imperialist aggression in Eretria along the Ethiopian border. Alongside protests throughout the African diaspora, activists protested what was quickly becoming known as the Abyssinia crisis. In coming to see the Caribbean’s limitations and stressing Africa’s importance to global emancipation, James turned toward coloniality as a basis from which to theorize liberation.

Keywords:   anticolonial networks, Cyril Lionel Robert James, Amy Ashwood Garvey, George Padmore, London, New Negro movement, Caribbean, Africa, coloniality, liberation

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