Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Red Land to the SouthAmerican Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James H. Cox

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816675975

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816675975.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 16 May 2022

The Return to Mexico

The Return to Mexico

Gerald Vizenor and Leslie Marmon Silko at the Quincentennial

Chapter:
(p.173) Chapter 5 The Return to Mexico
Source:
The Red Land to the South
Author(s):

James H. Cox

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816675975.003.0006

This chapter examines the works of first-generation renaissance writers Gerald Vizenor and Leslie Marmon Silko to address how their shared visions of indigenous Mexico constitute a point of convergence. The publication of Vizenor’s The Heirs of Columbus and Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead enabled the Greater Indian Territory to make a dramatic return to American Indian literature in 1991 and to expand into Canada, the Carribbean, and Central and South America. Vizenor’s The Heirs of Columbus is a narrative of migration and the creation of a new, sovereign Anishinabe tribal nation with significant Mayan origins; while in Silko’s Almanac of the Dead, the Mayans play a central role in the emergent pan-North American indigenous rather than tribal nation-specific revolutionary movement.

Keywords:   Gerald Vizenor, Leslie Marmon Silko, indigenous Mexico, The Heirs of Columbus, Almanac of the Dead, Greater Indian Territory, American Indian literature, Mayan origins

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.