Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Police in the HallwaysDiscipline in an Urban High School$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kathleen Nolan

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816675524

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 14 June 2021

Recommendations for Effective Urban Schooling and Sound Discipline

Recommendations for Effective Urban Schooling and Sound Discipline

Chapter:
(p.163) Conclusion Recommendations for Effective Urban Schooling and Sound Discipline
Source:
Police in the Hallways
Author(s):

Kathleen Nolan

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.003.0009

The conclusion summarizes the main point as discussed in this book—that aggressive implementation of zero tolerance and order maintenance policies have created a flow of students into the criminal justice system, especially as these actions often inspire oppositional behavior in the students as a way of maintaining their dignity and self-assertion. An analysis of this behavior from the students’ perspectives and at the micro level can reveal the shortcomings of current institutional policies and practices. However, zero tolerance and order maintenance only constitute two of the many social and economic realities plaguing the youths from low-income urban families. In order to consider alternative possibilities, we must pay closer attention to the experiences and perspectives of the people most affected by these policies and practices.

Keywords:   criminal justice system, low-income urban families, zero tolerance, order maintenance, oppositional behavior

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.