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Police in the HallwaysDiscipline in an Urban High School$
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Kathleen Nolan

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816675524

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.001.0001

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Tensions between Educational Approaches and Discourses of Control

Tensions between Educational Approaches and Discourses of Control

Chapter:
(p.95) Chapter 5 Tensions between Educational Approaches and Discourses of Control
Source:
Police in the Hallways
Author(s):

Kathleen Nolan

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.003.0006

This chapter explores the tension between the more constructive disciplinary approach generally favored by school officials, and the aggressive street policing supported by the police. It must be noted that the educators are accepting of order-maintenance policing—not as the ideal, but as the norm and the legitimized response to disruption. In the broader spectrum, there is a school–prison dynamic, the complexities of which must be illuminated further. Students do not generally find themselves in prison after one run-in with the law enforcement, but their often minor infractions are accumulated over time—more so when they ignore too many court summons as a form of protest. Some do spend time in jail as a result of these escalating factors, but most students never make it as far as prison, and are more frequently subjected to low-level penal management.

Keywords:   order-maintenance policing, school–prison dynamic, law enforcement, court summons, penal management, educators

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