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Police in the HallwaysDiscipline in an Urban High School$
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Kathleen Nolan

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816675524

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 18 June 2021

Against the Law

Against the Law

Student Noncompliance and Contestation

Chapter:
(p.73) Chapter 4 Against the Law
Source:
Police in the Hallways
Author(s):

Kathleen Nolan

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.003.0005

This chapter describes the attempts of students to assert themselves within the harsh police regime at school. The common rationale for noncompliance with police dictates is due to the usual police approach to order maintenance, which is often considered as bordering on the unnecessarily harsh. Noncompliance poses as a way (among several) in which students can protest against the culture of control—it is an assertion of the self and an expression of indignation. In this way, students maintained a sense of dignity. However, by contesting law enforcement, the students have also reinforced media images of urban students as hopelessly undisciplined and unruly. In doing so, the students have inadvertently created an image of themselves as the criminalized class—one in need of being policed.

Keywords:   order maintenance, noncompliance, urban students, media images, criminalized class

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