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Corporate SovereigntyLaw and Government under Capitalism$
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Joshua Barkan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780816674268

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816674268.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 23 June 2021

Personhood

Personhood

Chapter:
(p.65) Chapter Three Personhood
Source:
Corporate Sovereignty
Author(s):

Joshua Barkan

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816674268.003.0004

This chapter explains the reworking of corporate sovereignty in the context of modern U.S. corporate law by describing corporate personhood and analyzing 19th- and early-20th-century literature of lawyers, political economists, and public figures to understand how corporations changed from fundamental institutions of government into private, capitalist firms. It discusses corporate personhood as a retroactive attempt to rationalize an institution connected with early modern models of sovereignty and police within the juridical framework of a liberal capitalist political economy that centers on concepts of personhood, rights, and citizenship. The chapter also reviews Matt Wuerker’s drawing “Corpenstein”, which echo earlier presentations of corporations as monsters.

Keywords:   corporate sovereignty, U.S. corporate law, capitalist firms, corporate personhood, capitalist political economy, rights, citizenship, Matt Wuerker, Corpenstein

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