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I Think I AmPhilip K. Dick$
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Laurence A. Rickels

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780816666652

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816666652.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 05 July 2022

Dick Manfred

Dick Manfred

Chapter:
(p.106) Dick Manfred
Source:
I Think I Am
Author(s):

Laurence A. Rickels

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816666652.003.0008

This chapter explores the tension span occupied by the schizophrenic boy in Melanie Klein’s case of Dick and Lord Byron’s Faustian drama Manfred. In her 1930 chapter “The Importance of Symbol Formation in the Development of the Ego,” Klein explores a case of childhood schizophrenia, the treatability of which as arrested development is the very measure, measured in reverse, of treatment difficulties encountered with young adult schizophrenics who must fill in the blank of held-back development with the double whammy of regression. Klein opens with the all- importance of sadism in early mental development and its transmutation through symbolism. She treats Dick successfully because his so-called psychotic traits are, in the real time of development, inhibitions that can be overcome. In Manfred, Byron wrests Faustian striving from Christian pact psychology and sends his Faust figure through a series of sessions that leads through mourning to a cure.

Keywords:   schizophrenics, Melanie Klein, Lord Byron, Manfred, schizophrenia, sadism, mental development, mourning, Christian pact psychology, regression

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