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Firsting and LastingWriting Indians out of Existence in New England$
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Jean M. O'Brien

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780816665778

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816665778.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 06 April 2020

Resisting

Resisting

Claims in Texts about Indian Extinction Fail Even As They Are Being Made

Chapter:
(p.145) Chapter 4 Resisting
Source:
Firsting and Lasting
Author(s):

Jean M. O’Brien

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816665778.003.0004

This chapter talks about how Indians resisted their obliteration from the nineteenth-century New England by adapting to social and cultural advancements as part of making their way in a changing world. Evidence shows that Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island have been giving official recognition of Indians through guardianship systems, acknowledging the Mohegan, Pequot and Niantic tribes, among others. The chapter details the Indians’ struggles in living alongside the non-Indians and their modernity; how they survived settler colonialism while experiencing racial discrimination and contempt from non-Indians. It cites two examples of local texts, a history of Duxbury, Massachusetts, and one of Dorchester, Massachusetts, that contain instances of demonstrating Indian survival in New England, a further evidence of the Indian resistance to the extinction myth.

Keywords:   Indians, New England, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Mohegan, Pequot, Niantic, Indian extinction myth

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