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The City as CampusUrbanism and Higher Education in Chicago$
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Sharon Haar

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816665648

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816665648.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MINNESOTA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.minnesota.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MNSO for personal use.date: 16 July 2020

New Institutions for a New Environment: Pedagogical Space in the Progressive City

New Institutions for a New Environment: Pedagogical Space in the Progressive City

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 New Institutions for a New Environment: Pedagogical Space in the Progressive City
Source:
The City as Campus
Author(s):

Sharon Haar

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816665648.003.0001

This chapter discusses the growing development of higher education vis-à-vis urban expansion. Two growing institutions—the Hull-House Social Settlement and the University of Chicago—but were established in reply to the rising demands for an educated working class within an increasingly industrialized city. The Hull-House had started out as a residential district before expanding into a “prototype” campus integrated with the city at large. The University of Chicago, in contrast, was a facility dedicated to research, by using Chicago as a laboratory for developing universal theories of urban transformation. Yet despite such distinct approaches, these two institutions have become the basis of urban life in the years to come, illustrating the fact that knowledge development is directly tied to land development.

Keywords:   knowledge development, land development, Hull-House Social Settlement, University of Chicago, prototype campus, urbanization

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