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“Remember What You Are”: Gendering Citizenship, the Indian Act, and (Re)mapping the Settler Nation-State

“Remember What You Are”: Gendering Citizenship, the Indian Act, and (Re)mapping the Settler Nation-State

Chapter:
(p.41) 1 “Remember What You Are”: Gendering Citizenship, the Indian Act, and (Re)mapping the Settler Nation-State
Source:
Mark My Words
Author(s):
Mishuana Goeman
Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816677900.003.0002

In chapter one, an examination of two short stories by E. Pauline Johnson exemplify the interstices of race, gender, and nation as they pertain to the concept of civilizing Indians and excluding Native women from national spaces (both First Nation and Canada) through the Indian Act in the early 1900's. Johnson, through her heroines and the intimate act of marriage and public act of citizenship, speaks to the colonial restructuring of Native lands and bodies.

Keywords:   Indigenous Studies, Native American Studies, Native Feminism, Women of Color Feminism, Native American Literature, Gender and Colonialism, Imperialism, Self-determination, National in Literature, Geography and Literature

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