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Peace Corps FantasiesHow Development Shaped the Global Sixties$
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Molly Geidel

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780816692217

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816692217.001.0001

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Integration and Its Limits

Integration and Its Limits

From Romantic Racism to Peace Corps Authenticity

Chapter:
(p.33) 2 Integration and Its Limits
Source:
Peace Corps Fantasies
Author(s):

Molly Geidel

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816692217.003.0002

Chapter two continues to discuss how the 1960s Peace Corps embodied a racialized, gendered vision of modernity that linked economic integration to freedom, frontier masculinity, and global brotherhood. Placing these discourse in the context of late-1950s best-selling novels, then tracing them through Peace Corps volunteer memoirs, the chapter attempts to understand how the Peace Corps inaugurated and codified new models for relating to racial and cultural others, using modernization doctrines to revise the romantic–racist vision of rebel masculinity that captured the popular imagination in the 1950s.

Keywords:   Peace Corps, literature, racial others, cultural others, modernization, romantic-racist vision, rebel masculinity

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