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Shipwreck Modernity"Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719"$
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Steve Mentz

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780816691036

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816691036.001.0001

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“We Split”

“We Split”

Sea Poetry and Maritime Crisis

Chapter:
(p.131) Chapter 6 “We Split”
Source:
Shipwreck Modernity
Author(s):

Steve Mentz

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816691036.003.0006

Considering the short-lived seventeenth-century vogue for “piscatorial poetry” in which fishermen replaced shepherds as ideal figures for pastoral life, this chapter on sea poetry argues that the structures of verse provided ways for sailors and poets to conceptualize the dynamic ocean. In additional to the piscatorialists, the chapter considers the opening scene of The Tempest, two verse letters by John Donne, and modern sea-poetry by Melville, Wallace Stevens, and Thomas Hardy.

Keywords:   The Tempest, Piscatorial poetry, Fishermen, Ocean, Piscatorialism, William Shakespeare, John Donne, Herman Melville, Wallace Stevens, Thomas Hardy

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