Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Reinventing CitizenshipBlack Los Angeles, Korean Kawasaki, and Community Participation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kazuyo Tsuchiya

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780816681112

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816681112.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Between Inclusion and Exclusion

Between Inclusion and Exclusion

The Origins of the U.S. Community Action Program

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 Between Inclusion and Exclusion
Source:
Reinventing Citizenship
Author(s):

Kazuyo Tsuchiya

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816681112.003.0002

This chapter discusses the Community Action Program (CAP) and its doctrine of the “maximum feasible participation” of the poor in the early 1960s. The CAP was created under the leadership of the Bureau of the Budget when poverty was largely ignored during the post-World War II period in the United States One of its proposals was to distribute the resources of existing public and private organizations for the improvement of educational, training, health, and other services for the poor. However, the policy makers of CAP were divided over how to integrate the poor and the Black Americans into state programs; thus, the original concept of CAP was suspended between the rubrics of inclusion and exclusion.

Keywords:   Community Action Program, poverty, United States, Bureau of the Budget, poor

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.