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The Seeds We PlantedPortraits of a Native Hawaiian Charter School$
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Noelani Goodyear-Ka'opua

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780816680474

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816680474.001.0001

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Rebuilding the Structures That Feed Us

Rebuilding the Structures That Feed Us

‘Auwai, Lo‘i Kalo, and Kuleana

Chapter:
(p.127) Three Rebuilding the Structures That Feed Us
Source:
The Seeds We Planted
Author(s):

Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816680474.003.0004

Chapters three through five explore the ways ‘āina (land)-based curricula allow participants to resist confinement within the boundaries of settler state-inscribed safety zones by rebuilding generative Indigenous structures: the ‘auwai (irrigation ditch), the wa‘a (canoe) and the leo (voice). This chapter focuses on the revitalization of kalo (taro) cultivation, and it elaborates the Hawaiian notion of “kuleana.” As frame for learning, this concept allows people of different positionalities (gender, nationality, indigeneity) to establish meaningful connections to land and to each other without glossing differences in power, privilege and genealogy.

Keywords:   Indigenous education, No Child Left Behind, settler colonialism, Indigenous resurgence, aloha ‘āina, kuleana, hoʻomana, Hawaiian studies, educational ethnography, Hawaiian sovereignty

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