Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Fritz LangThe Nature of the Beast$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Patrick McGilligan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780816676552

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816676552.001.0001

Show Summary Details

1941–1945

1941–1945

Chapter:
(p.287) Chapter 14 1941–1945
Source:
Fritz Lang
Author(s):

Patrick McGilligan

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816676552.003.0015

This chapter details events in Fritz Lang’s life from 1941 to 1945. The bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, forced America to abandon its isolationism and enter the rapidly escalating war. Directors were in the forefront of those in Hollywood who contributed to the war effort. Yet Fritz Lang never volunteered any military-related duty in the fight against the nation he had once embraced and which he now reviled. Indeed, Lang would exploit the war for publicity and career advantage. It was during these years that the story of his encounter with the Nazis first surfaced in the press, in interviews and articles promoting his quartet of war-inspired productions: Man Hunt, Hangmen Also Die, Ministry of Fear, and Cloak and Dagger. That is one of the reasons why some people, especially emigres, associated the director’s story with self-serving opportunism.

Keywords:   Fritz Lang, biography, directors, Nazis, World War II

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.