Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
On the Run in Siberia$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rane Willerslev

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816676262

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816676262.001.0001

Show Summary Details

In the Yukaghirs’ Camp

In the Yukaghirs’ Camp

Chapter:
(p.102) (p.103) 7 In the Yukaghirs’ Camp
Source:
On the Run in Siberia
Author(s):

Rane Willerslev

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816676262.003.0008

In this chapter, the author narrates his experience in the Siberian taiga hunting for moose in the company of a Yukaghir family. He describes Spiridon Spiridonov, which was considered the greatest moose hunter among the Yukaghirs, and his sons Yura and Peter. Everything the author had seen and heard in the few days previously had given him a new insight into the hunters’ world—an insight that decisively overturns his preconception of hunting as something fundamentally violent. It is a widespread perception among anthropologists that hunting has played a decisive role in human evolution. Spiridon and his hunting group regarded hunting as a fundamentally nonviolent activity, in which the moose, out of sexual desire or rather love for the hunter, virtually sacrifices itself to them. The fishing net is the hunter’s most important tool, more important than the rifle.

Keywords:   taiga, Siberia, hunting, moose, Yukaghir, Spiridon Spiridonov, hunters, human evolution, fishing net

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.