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Corn Palaces and Butter QueensA History of Crop Art and Dairy Sculpture$
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Pamela H. Simpson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816676194

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816676194.001.0001

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Icons of Abundance

Icons of Abundance

Chapter:
(p.181) Conclusion Icons of Abundance
Source:
Corn Palaces and Butter Queens
Author(s):

Pamela H. Simpson

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816676194.003.0008

This concluding chapter focuses on three broader themes: democracy and providence; modernism and progress; and the concept of abundance. It argues that food art began on the tables of the wealthy, but it expanded democratically at the Midwestern festivals and fairs to include a broad populace. It discusses that food-art constructions were the expression of a commonly held belief in the strength, innate goodness, and exceptional abundance of the country. Crop art, corn palaces, and butter sculpture evoked feelings of awe and wonder because the structures were so imaginative even as the materials were so commonplace. The display of such riches marked the victory of the Industrial Revolution and a shift from a world of scarcity to one of abundance.

Keywords:   agricultural abundance, food art, fairs, crop art, corn palaces, butter sculpture

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