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Corn Palaces and Butter QueensA History of Crop Art and Dairy Sculpture$
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Pamela H. Simpson

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816676194

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816676194.001.0001

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Boosters, Saracens, and Indians

Boosters, Saracens, and Indians

Chapter:
(p.113) 5 Boosters, Saracens, and Indians
Source:
Corn Palaces and Butter Queens
Author(s):

Pamela H. Simpson

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816676194.003.0005

This chapter focuses on cereal architecture. It discusses the role of boosters in the promotion of the Midwest. Several case studies offer evidence of patterns of overlapping interests in land speculation, railroads, agriculture, and industrial development. The chapter explains that boosterism was based on the premise that any town could become an important urban center if its leading citizens did enough to promote its unique potential. It also examines the iconography of the corn palaces, beginning with their use of Moorish architectural forms to evoke a festive exoticism. The examination of corn-palace imagery introduces both the symbolic representation of American Indians and their active participation in the entertainments and parades.

Keywords:   cereal architecture, boosters, railroads, land speculation, agriculture, boosterism, American Indians, corn palaces

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