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The Red Land to the SouthAmerican Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico$
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James H. Cox

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816675975

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816675975.001.0001

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“Mexico Is an Indian Country”

“Mexico Is an Indian Country”

American Indian Diplomacy in Native Nonfiction and Todd Downing’s The Mexican Earth

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter 3 “Mexico Is an Indian Country”
Source:
The Red Land to the South
Author(s):

James H. Cox

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816675975.003.0004

This chapter studies how Todd Downing, Will Rogers, and many of the authors from the 1920s to the 1960s model and document the diplomacy in American Indian literature and politics in their writing. These authors represented American Indians in tribal nation, intertribal, pan-Indian, U.S., and settler-colonial and indigenous transnational political arenas, and cultivated good relations among individual indigenous people, tribal nations, intertribal and pan-Indian organizations, and the United States. The chapter specifically considers Todd Downing’s The Mexican Earth (1940), which anticipates late twentieth and early twenty-first-century coalitions between indigenous people in the United States and Mexico.

Keywords:   Todd Downing, Will Rogers, diplomacy, American Indian literature, American Indians, indigenous people, The Mexican Earth

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