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Police in the HallwaysDiscipline in an Urban High School$
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Kathleen Nolan

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816675524

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.001.0001

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The Underlife Oppositional Behavior at Urban Public High School

The Underlife Oppositional Behavior at Urban Public High School

Chapter:
(p.117) Chapter 6 The Underlife Oppositional Behavior at Urban Public High School
Source:
Police in the Hallways
Author(s):

Kathleen Nolan

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816675524.003.0007

This chapter examines the most pervasive forms of oppositional behavior in the school–classroom misbehavior, cutting classes, disruption, hat wearing, gambling, and fighting, as well as the students’ perspectives and rationales for their misbehavior. Students often knowingly put themselves in situations where they clash with law enforcement and school officials because they seek certain benefits from such efforts. With Erving Goffman’s analysis of human behavior in tightly controlled institutional settings as context, students have demonstrated resourcefulness in the midst of educational and economic exclusion and penal control. They are able to find ways of regaining their self-assertion and developing identities that they could be proud of; they can also identify themselves as part of a particular community, manage the violence in their lives (which official policies often did little to alleviate), make a little money, and even have some fun.

Keywords:   oppositional behavior, law enforcement, school officials, Erving Goffman, human behavior, penal control, self-assertion

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