Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Survival SchoolsThe American Indian Movement and Community Education in the Twin Cities$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Julie L. Davis

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780816674282

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816674282.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Keeping Ourselves Together: Education, Child Welfare, and Aim’s Advocacy for Indian Families, 1968–1972

Keeping Ourselves Together: Education, Child Welfare, and Aim’s Advocacy for Indian Families, 1968–1972

Chapter:
(p.53) Chapter 2 Keeping Ourselves Together: Education, Child Welfare, and Aim’s Advocacy for Indian Families, 1968–1972
Source:
Survival Schools
Author(s):

Julie L. Davis

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816674282.003.0003

Chapter Two traces the origins of the AIM survival schools to the conflicts Twin Cities Indian families experienced with the public school systems and the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, and to Indian people’s struggles with cultural dissonance and the pressure to assimilate in postwar urban society. It describes AIM’s efforts to help local Indian people in each of these areas and explains these issues in their national and international context. The chapter ends by narrating the founding of the two Twin Cities survival schools.

Keywords:   American Indian, Minnesota, Midwest, Alternative Education, Activism, Education, Assimilation, Colonialism, Decolonization, Public School

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.