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The Neoliberal DelugeHurricane Katrina, Late Capitalism, and the Remaking of New Orleans$
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Cedric Johnson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816673247

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816673247.001.0001

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Mega-Events, the Superdome, and the Return of the Repressed in New Orleans

Mega-Events, the Superdome, and the Return of the Repressed in New Orleans

Chapter:
(p.87) Chapter 4 Mega-Events, the Superdome, and the Return of the Repressed in New Orleans
Source:
The Neoliberal Deluge
Author(s):

Paul A. Passavant

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816673247.003.0004

This chapter examines the repressive dimensions of the tourist city by focusing on how New Orleans handled the mega-event of Hurricane Katrina in light of how it handles mega-events such as the Super Bowl. In particular, it considers how New Orleans’s cityscape has been reconfigured through neoliberalization to mimic the differentiated niches of marketing mentalities. It argues that the post-Fordist city produces space in a manner that promotes its brand image to potential tourists and other consumers while at the same time inciting more extensive efforts of surveillance and control. It also contends that the segregative logic and capacities for control were made particularly evident in the wake of Katrina when those who were repressed and displaced, literally by post-Fordism’s built landscape, returned to those spaces of enclosure and consumption (the Superdome, the Morial Convention Center) in search of refuge and security.

Keywords:   tourist city, New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina, mega-events, cityscape, neoliberalization, marketing, post-Fordism, refuge, security

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