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The Neoliberal DelugeHurricane Katrina, Late Capitalism, and the Remaking of New Orleans$
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Cedric Johnson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816673247

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816673247.001.0001

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Making Citizens in Magnaville

Making Citizens in Magnaville

Katrina Refugees and Neoliberal Self-Governance

Chapter:
(p.60) Chapter 3 Making Citizens in Magnaville
Source:
The Neoliberal Deluge
Author(s):

Geoffrey Whitehall

Cedric Johnson

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816673247.003.0003

This chapter examines the unique terms of neoliberal sovereignty where private institutions and market rationality increasingly create the conditions for meaningful citizenship, mobility, material comfort, and security for some while excluding others. It begins by revisiting media debates over usage of the term “refugee” to describe disaster victims, suggesting that such debates revealed the inadequacy of civil rights discourse for addressing new states of vulnerability and exclusion under neoliberalism. It then looks at the “Magnaville,” a transitional residential settlement created by Canadian industrialist Frank Stronach as an effort to promote neoliberal self-governance in New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Although this charitable project addressed the immediate needs of some evacuees, its most enduring accomplishment was to advance a privatized approach to relief and reconstruction and demonstrate how philanthropy and individual agency can resolve the deep inequalities produced by global capital.

Keywords:   neoliberal sovereignty, citizenship, neoliberalism, Magnaville, residential settlement, Frank Stronach, neoliberal self-governance, New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina, reconstruction

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