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Strategies for Social Change$
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Gregory M. Maney, Rachel V. Kutz-Flamenbaum, and Deana A. Rohlinger

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816672899

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816672899.001.0001

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Similar Strategies, Different Outcomes: Institutional Histories of the Christian Right of Canada and of the United States

Similar Strategies, Different Outcomes: Institutional Histories of the Christian Right of Canada and of the United States

Chapter:
(p.245) 11 Similar Strategies, Different Outcomes: Institutional Histories of the Christian Right of Canada and of the United States
Source:
Strategies for Social Change
Author(s):

Tina Fetner

Carrie Sanders

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816672899.003.0011

This chapter is concerned with the Christian right movements in the United States and Canada, both of which used the same strategies yet produced different results. For instance, the parachurch organizations built in the United States by conservative evangelicals were more numerous, more densely networked, and had more fluid paths of communication than Canadian evangelicals. U.S. Christian right activists routinely use media institutions to reach potential supporters; while in Canada, church networks are fewer and not very organized, resulting to a much more difficult communication among leaders and constituents willing to engage in political action. Scholars have argued that this gap in movement outcomes stems from the fact that people in the United States are more religious than those in Canada, which explains the broader base of support for the U.S. Christian right.

Keywords:   Christian right movements, United States, Canada, parachurch, conservative evangelicals, Christian right, U.S. Christian right activist, Canadian evangelicals

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