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Nakagami, JapanBuraku and the Writing of Ethnicity$
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Anne McKnight

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816672851

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816672851.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.233) Conclusion
Source:
Nakagami, Japan
Author(s):

Anne McKnight

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816672851.003.0008

This chapter explains how placing Nakagami’s work within the context of the historical and cultural modernization of the early twentieth century, including mixed-media work and subcultural forms of narrative, gives new light to understanding the role of writing in the postwar landscape. The book as a whole demonstrates how Nakagami’s literary endeavors address the relationships between literary and political representation, and aesthetics and social movements. He illustrates the personal responsibility of being different in a cultural marketplace; Nakagami’s roji suggests the discarding of one’s habitual vocabularies of identity and difference, and instead understand the neologisms of experience. The concept of parallax was essential to Nakagami’s writing, his twofold perspective attempted to contradict the myth of Japan’s postwar reality as a homogeneous society.

Keywords:   Kenji Nakagami, modernization, mixed-media work, subcultural forms, neologisms, parallax, postwar Japan

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