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Microfinance and Its DiscontentsWomen in Debt in Bangladesh$
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Lamia Karim

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816670949

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816670949.001.0001

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From Disciplined Subjects to Political Agents?

From Disciplined Subjects to Political Agents?

Chapter:
(p.191) Conclusion From Disciplined Subjects to Political Agents?
Source:
Microfinance and Its Discontents
Author(s):

Lamia Karim

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816670949.003.0007

The conclusion observes the steady growth both of local and international NGOs as well as the Bangladeshi people’s mounting interest in national politics. As the microfinance industry expanded during the twenty-first century, Bangladesh had become the testing grounds of many developmental and financial parties—both at home and from abroad—for social welfare and development practices. These financial networks have eventually ended up promoting neoliberal ideals that limit social progress and autonomy within Bangladesh. Despite these issues, the author is optimistic that Bangladeshi’s citizens will soon find real empowerment for themselves and run their country their own way.

Keywords:   microfinance industry, financial networks, Bangladesh, social progress, autonomy, NGOs, national politics, empowerment, social welfare

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