Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Into the Universe of Technical Images$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Vilém Flusser

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816670208

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816670208.001.0001

Show Summary Details

To Prepare

To Prepare

Chapter:
(p.105) To Prepare
Source:
Into the Universe of Technical Images
Author(s):

Vilém Flusser

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816670208.003.0014

This chapter discusses telematics as a technology that permits all fabricated information to be stored in permanent memory. In telematic dialogues, human and artificial memories exchange information to synthesize new information and to store it artificially. In this way, not only the new information but also the human memories that produced it are protected from oblivion. The real intention of telematics is to become immortal because it fosters an awareness that freedom lies not only in producing information but also in preserving this information from natural entropy—that we create not to die. If we compare natural history with cultural history, that is, the random with the strategic production of information, intentional creation (freedom) appears in a new light. In particular, it appears that in both cases, a discontinuous progress is occurring amid general ruin. Even in cultural history, each new level of information begins to decay as soon as it appears. Telematics will put an end to this problematic situation by allowing information generation and storage without a material support.

Keywords:   telematics, information, memory, dialogue, freedom, natural history, cultural history, information generation, information storage

Minnesota Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.