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The Copyright Thing Doesn't Work HereAdinkra and Kente Cloth and Intellectual Property in Ghana$
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Boatema Boateng

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816670024

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816670024.001.0001

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Your Face Doesn’t Go Anywhere

Your Face Doesn’t Go Anywhere

Cultural Production and Legal Subjectivity

Chapter:
(p.91) Chapter 3 Your Face Doesn’t Go Anywhere
Source:
The Copyright Thing Doesn't Work Here
Author(s):

Boatema Boateng

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816670024.003.0004

This chapter discusses how both adinkra and kente makers and musicians fight for the copyright protection of their products. Ghanaian recording artists and producers began to press for more effective copyright protection of their work in the late 1970s after cassette recording technology became widely available in Ghana. Ghanaian cloth producers, however, did not ask the government for the protection of their product. A lobbying group of musicians were instrumental in shaping various aspects of the country’s intellectual property law since Ghana’s independence in 1957. They demonstrate that the ownership claims around different kinds of cultural production are dependent on the capacity to relate to the state as a citizen and legal subject.

Keywords:   adinkra, kente, musicians, copyright protection, legal subject, Ghana

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