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Families ApartMigrant Mothers and the Conflicts of Labor and Love$
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Geraldine Pratt

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780816669981

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816669981.001.0001

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Research into Action

Research into Action

Chapter:
(p.163) Conclusion Research into Action
Source:
Families Apart
Author(s):

Geraldine Pratt

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816669981.003.0006

This concluding chapter attempts to frame the rapid and troubling marginalization of Filipino youths as enveloped within a more expansive set of political, economic, social, and affective relations. Migration and transnationalism, with respect to the Filipino diaspora, are category mistakes that mis-specify the processes involved. The Philippine Women Centre’s insistence on scrapping the Live-In Caregiver Program (LCP) is understandable within such a positioning. They reason that care work should be highly valued in Canada, and consequently Filipino caregivers should migrate to Canada with their families as immigrants, not as temporary workers. But the struggle against the LCP is not only against the gross devaluation of care work in Canada; it is simultaneously a refusal of labor export as an economic strategy of the Philippine state, a commitment to work towards altering the conditions in the Philippines that necessitate migration, and a powerful critique of the hierarchical alignment of nation-states globally.

Keywords:   marginalization, Filipino youths, migration, transnationalism, Filipino diaspora, Philippine Women Centre, Live-In Caregiver Program, care work, Filipino caregivers, labor export

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