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I Think I AmPhilip K. Dick$
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Laurence A. Rickels

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780816666652

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816666652.001.0001

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Crucifictions

Crucifictions

Chapter:
(p.190) Crucifictions
Source:
I Think I Am
Author(s):

Laurence A. Rickels

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816666652.003.0016

This chapter considers science fiction writer Philip K. Dick’s novels The World Jones Made and Counter-Clock World. The World Jones Made contemplates the unattended aberration that is technophobicity, which arises when the group-psychologization of gadget love or life as preparedness is dismissed or reinterpreted in favor of rationalization, the world Ernest Jones made. What Jones admits to be his own “provincialism” regarding alien life motivates the interstellar search for Earth’s double where human life would not require technological or evolutionary adaptation to and internalization of alien conditions of existence. Counter-Clock World was originally titled “The Dead Grow Young” and “The Dead Are Young”; where the former takes growing pains to reverse loss, the latter focuses on the dead as our future, the other next generation. As all three titles underscore, in this Hobart Phase the finitude of lifetime is also resurrected. The novel recognizes as its own inside view the erad powers of the archive (the fever or fire of the archive in Jacques Derrida’s reading).

Keywords:   science fiction, Philip K. Dick, novels, The World Jones Made, Counter-Clock World, technophobicity, rationalization, alien life, dead, archive

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