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The Tourist StatePerforming Leisure, Liberalism, and Race in New Zealand$
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Margaret Werry

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816666058

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816666058.001.0001

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Altered States: Global Hollywood, the Rise of Wellywood, and the Moving Image of Race

Altered States: Global Hollywood, the Rise of Wellywood, and the Moving Image of Race

Chapter:
(p.189) Chapter 5 Altered States: Global Hollywood, the Rise of Wellywood, and the Moving Image of Race
Source:
The Tourist State
Author(s):

Margaret Werry

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816666058.003.0005

This chapter examines the role played by the film industry—a crucial site of national publicity and cultural sovereignty—in Aotearoa New Zealand’s rebirth as a tourist state. It considers the renaissance of domestic film in state-sponsored international coproductions and the questions it raises about the traffic in (and concomitant transformation of) indigeneity that underpins neoliberalization. The chapter focuses on two state-sponsored, touristically leveraged fictions that highlight the convergence between tourism and cinema: the Lord of the Rings trilogy and Whale Rider. Whereas Lord of the Rings locally rehabilitates, nationally locates, and globally recirculates the heroic mythos of whiteness, Whale Rider functions as an apparatus for New Zealand to brand itself abroad through the realization of its “cultural capital” and poses indigeneity as the aspirational emblem of a new raceless but rooted cultural citizenship.

Keywords:   film industry, Aotearoa, tourism, cinema, Lord of the Rings, Whale Rider, whiteness, cultural capital, race, cultural citizenship

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