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Militarized CurrentsToward a Decolonized Future in Asia and the Pacific$
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Setsu Shigematsu and Keith L. Camacho

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780816665051

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816665051.001.0001

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Memorializing Pu‘uloa and Remembering Pearl Harbor

Memorializing Pu‘uloa and Remembering Pearl Harbor

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Memorializing Pu‘uloa and Remembering Pearl Harbor
Source:
Militarized Currents
Author(s):

Jon Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816665051.003.0001

This chapter provides a countermemory and counterdiscourse to the master historiographical narratives of Japan’s “surprise attack” on the United States during World War II. By foregrounding the Hawaiian naming of Pu’uloa, the imposed colonial renaming of Pearl Harbor is unsettled. The American naming can be understood as a process of militarized colonization inscribing and claiming possession of the altered and now-prohibitive militarized terrain. The chapter begins the discussion with Hawaiian song and poetry that recalls another system of values and epistemologies of the place known as Pu’uloa. By recounting personal familial genealogies that intimately connect American militarism with Hawaiian dispossession and anticolonial movements, the chapter explores the complex dynamics of memory and the different forces of identity formation and divergent desires across four generations.

Keywords:   militarism, Japan, United States, World War II, Hawaii, Pu’uloa, Pearl Harbor, colonization, Hawaiian song, Hawaiian poetry

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