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Spaces between UsQueer Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Decolonization$
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Scott Lauria Morgensen

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816656325

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816656325.001.0001

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“Together We Are Stronger”

“Together We Are Stronger”

Decolonizing Gender and Sexuality inTransnational Native AIDS Organizing

Chapter:
(p.195) Chapter 6 “Together We Are Stronger”
Source:
Spaces between Us
Author(s):

Scott Lauria Morgensen

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816656325.003.0007

This chapter discusses how Native activist critiques of heteropatriarchy in Native communities, settler states, and global fields mark the settler colonial biopolitics of health governance and stimulate global Indigenous alliance for decolonization. While homonationalism produces queer integration into settler citizenship and union with Native lands by naturalizing settlements, Native queer activists lead Native peoples to challenge settler colonialism, the very formation homonationalism reinforces. Thus, Native activists resemble queers of color who lead communities of color in antiheteropatriarchal struggles against imperialism and racism that challenge the power of the state. The chapter also argues that by engaging Native peoples in diasporas caused by colonization, Native queer and Two-Spirit movements model transnational modes of naming and defending Native sovereignty.

Keywords:   Native, activists, settler states, biopolitics, settlements, queer, racism, Two-Spirit

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