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Spaces between UsQueer Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Decolonization$
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Scott Lauria Morgensen

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816656325

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816656325.001.0001

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The Biopolitics of Settler Sexuality and Queer Modernities

The Biopolitics of Settler Sexuality and Queer Modernities

Chapter:
(p.31) Chapter 1 The Biopolitics of Settler Sexuality and Queer Modernities
Source:
Spaces between Us
Author(s):

Scott Lauria Morgensen

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816656325.003.0002

This chapter explores how “settler sexuality” queers Native peoples to attempt their elimination compatibly with emphasizing racialized heteropatriarchal control over subject people of color placed on Native lands. The queering of white settlers then rests on the existence of a settler colonialism that conditions both heteronormative and queer gender and sexual politics on stolen land, which Two-Spirit activists and Native queer resist. It argues that the biopolitics of settler colonialism creates settler sexuality as the context traversed by Native and non-Native people formulating queer modernities. Non-Native queer modernities develop by gathering a multiracial, transnational constituency as a diversity that exists in a non-Native relationship to disappearing indigeneity. Moreover, settler colonialism is a primary condition of the history of sexuality in the United States.

Keywords:   settler sexuality, queers, Natives, non-Natives, sexual politics, Two-Spirit, biopolitics, settler colonialism

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