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Dubai, the City as Corporation$
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Ahmed Kanna

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816656301

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816656301.001.0001

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Politicizing Dubai Space

Politicizing Dubai Space

Chapter:
(p.205) Conclusion Politicizing Dubai Space
Source:
Dubai, the City as Corporation
Author(s):

Ahmed Kanna

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816656301.003.0007

The conclusion discusses the more current instances of the state attempting to create an image of itself as an objective arbiter by isolating itself from the more recent economic issues plaguing Dubai—most of them cases of immigrant labor unrest. Many of these issues are brushed aside by the Dubayyan ruling class as incidents caused by “a few bad eggs” rather than their workings being part of the overall political landscape engendered in the city’s urbanist ideology. The text returns to the inevitable correlation between politics and space discussed in previous chapters, noting that even naturalized citizens might feel out of place in their own city—as still more privileged, Western foreigners “occupy” the city in an unofficial capacity. While the city may be all about business, it fails to note an essential part of its history and economy—the immigrants.

Keywords:   Dubai, labor unrest, urbanist ideology, politics, immigrants, economy, history

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